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Which works of Russian writers formed the basis of famous operas

What are the works of Russian writers formed the basis of famous operas

As a rule, the basis for the libretto of operas and ballets go to literary works.

The brightness of the characters, an exciting storyline inspired composers to create music that sometimes becomes more popular than literary source.

AS Pushkin in music

Perhaps the works of Alexander Pushkin oftenall attracted the attention of Russian composers. Novel in "Eugene Onegin" poem inspired by the genius of the composer Pyotr Tchaikovsky to create the opera. The libretto, which is only loosely resembles the original, wrote Constantine Shilovsky. From the novel was only a love line 2 pairs - Lensky and Olga, Onegin and Tatiana. Mental throwing Onegin, because of which he was in the list of "superfluous men" are excluded from the plot. The opera was first staged in 1879 and has since been included in the repertoire of virtually every Russian opera.
One can not but recall the story "The Queen of Spades" and aboutopera created by PI Tchaikovsky on its grounds in 1890. The libretto was written by the composer's brother, M.I.Chaykovskim. Pyotr Ilyich personally wrote the lyrics for arias Eletski in Act II and Lisa in III.

The story "The Queen of Spades" was translated into French by Prosper Merimee, and became the basis for an opera written by composer F.Galevi.

The drama of Pushkin's "Boris Godunov" was the basis ofgrand opera, written by Modest Mussorgsky in 1869. The premiere was held due to the impediments of censorship only 5 years later. Hot delight the audience did not help - the opera was removed from the repertoire for censorship reasons several times. Clearly, the genius of both authors too has highlighted the problem of the relationship of the autocrat and the people, as well as the price you have to pay for power.
Here are a few pieces AS Pushkin, who became the literary basis of the operas: "The Golden Cockerel", "The Tale of Tsar Saltan" (Rimsky-Korsakov), 'Mazeppa' (Tchaikovsky), "The Little Mermaid" (Alexander Dargomyzhsky) "Ruslan and Lyudmila" (Glinka), "Dubrovsky" (EF Napravnik).

MY Lermontov in music

On the basis of Lermontov's "Demon" famous poemliterary critic and researcher of its creativity, PA Viskovatov wrote the libretto for an opera of the famous composer AG Rubinstein. The opera was written in 1871 and staged in St. Petersburg Mariinsky Theatre in 1875
AG Rubinstein wrote the music to yet another product of Lermontov's "Song of the Merchant Kalashnikov". Opera entitled "The Merchant Kalashnikov" was staged in 1880 at the Mariinsky Theatre. The author of the libretto became N.Kulikov.

Drama Lermontov's "Masquerade" became the basis of "Masquerade" libretto ballet AI Khachaturian.

Other Russian writers in music

Drama "The Tsar's Bride" by the famous Russian poetLA Mey was the basis of Rimsky-Korsakov, written at the end of the XIX century. The action takes place at the court of Ivan the Terrible and has pronounced features of the era.
Theme of the king's tyranny and lawlessness subjectsthe struggle of the free city of Pskov against Ivan the Terrible conquest of devoted and Rimsky-Korsakov's opera "The Maid of Pskov", for which the libretto written by the composer himself drama LA Mey.
Rimsky-Korsakov also composed the music for the opera "The Snow Maiden" based on the story of the great Russian playwright AN Ostrovsky.
Opera based on the tale NV Gogol "May Night" written by Rimsky-Korsakov, based on his own libretto composer. Other works of the great writer, "The Night Before Christmas" became a literary basis for the opera PI Tchaikovsky's "The Slippers".
In 1930, Soviet composer DD Shostakovich wrote the opera "Katerina Ismailova" based on the novel grounds NS Leskov's "Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk". Innovative Shostakovich's music caused a flurry of sharp politically motivated criticism. The opera was removed from the repertoire and restored only in 1962

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